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  • Leah Ungstad

Beautiful Winter

Updated: Dec 4, 2022

Tofino Community Food Initiative has a workshop coming up in December! Since the weather outside can some days be frightful, we’re taking our last local food skills workshop of 2022 into the Tofino Community Hall Kitchen.


Sourcing cranberries grown locally in Ahousaht, we plan to cook up a big batch of cranberry sauce to share for the holidays. Our awesome board member April Robson is going to demonstrate what you need to know about preserving food through the boiling water bath canning method. This will be an evening workshop on Wednesday Dec 14 at the Tofino Community Hall. Come and make cranberry sauce with us, and get festive in the community kitchen! Spaces are limited so remember to register here. It’s free to attend, and we’d love to see you!

The garden in December is a little bare as it hibernates through these coldest and darkest days of winter. This is an excellent time to evaluate your growing season. Make some notes about what worked and what didn’t. For myself, I’m promising to not sow tomatoes, cucumbers and squashes before May 1st next year. Sowing too early means you’ll have plants that need transplanting before the weather is ready to support their growth, and then the slugs get them. Some tasks to do in winter are to keep on mulching, and to rake up fallen leaves for your compost pile. Explore seed catalogues to choose some new varieties to try growing in the new year ahead.

Because our coastal weather is usually above freezing, we can grow cold hardy veggies all year round here. Some ways to give your winter veggies protection from rain, cold, and wind are with a cold frame or unheated greenhouse, or simply in a container under an eave. We can grow lettuce, celery, broccoli, and kale through the winter here on the West Coast.


Thanks for all your support this year! We wish you a great winter rest as we all dream of next year’s garden treasures!


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